Trible (tamtrible) wrote in little_details,
Trible
tamtrible
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Preindustrial glasswork and gold knives

Ok. Fairly standard preindustrial fantasy type setting. Magic requires use of gold, silver, copper, or tin (but only one of those, each interferes with the others). Tech level has *some* flexibility, but is definitely no later than, say, late Renaissance or so.

1. The "standard" Imperial coinage is glass beads of particular shapes/colors/patterns. Magic has very little use in glasswork (except for more control over fire). With that kind of tech level, what (relatively precise) shapes of beads would be easy vs hard (balls, cylinders, cubes, ovals, etc)? What colors would be practical (that do not contain any of the above-mentioned metals)? How easy/practical would it be to make (relatively precise) swirls or other patterns in the glass? How easy would it be to etch precise patterns into the glass? Any general resources on preindustrial glassworking? ("local" coinage is still mostly bits o' metal, the Imperial coinage is mostly for Official Imperial Business, mages, and anyone trading over long distances)

2. The tools/implements used to work magic need to be made at least partly of the metal needed for a particular "element", and not contain any of the *other* metals. So, any tech-level-appropriate suggestions on making a practical, functional knife that contains at least some gold, but no copper, silver, or tin? (inlay vs alloy vs electroplating vs...--magic would be fairly useless for this, however) And, in general, (since Earth mages, the ones who need gold, tend not to be *spectacularly* wealthy, and gold is bloody expensive) what would be the most practical and inexpensive tech-level-appropriate way to have usable gold-containing ritual tools? (brazier, candle holders, and so forth)
Tags: ~glass
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