Callisto-chan (callisto_chan) wrote in little_details,
Callisto-chan
callisto_chan
little_details

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Glass eyes in the late nineteenth century

I recently saw how modern false eyes were made, but the time period in which my story’s set in (1860s to mid-1875) means that there would be glass eyes around, and not whatever they’re made with today. And since my Google-fu is weak (and what I didn’t type in didn’t bring up much), I have a couple questions on glass eyes in late Victorian England:

1. The character in question is from an upper-middle-class family, so would he be able to afford such a thing?
2. Assuming the answer to question one is “yes”…this character, to be blunt, has no eyeballs. When they’re creating the false eyes, would he be able to choose whatever colour he damn well pleased, considering there’s no original eye to base the colours off of? Or would it be more likely that the eyes were created the same colour his actual eyes were?
3. I saw that modern false eyes attach to the eye muscles, and thus they move with the actual eye, but would eyes back then do that as well? Or would they just sit there and not move?
4. Would a random stranger be able to tell they’re false? Would there be something in the look of the eyes that could allow one to tell that they’re glass?
5. This last question might sound stupid, but would the character have to take the eyes out to sleep (implying that he wears them frequently)…or would he be more likely to wear them only now and then for appearances’ sake? I know that in the Harry Potter books you see Mad-Eye Moody talk about ocular hygiene while dousing his one false eye in a glass of water, but I wondered if real people did that, sans the remark about ocular hygiene. :P (It’d be amusing to write something like that, but not necessary if it’s not plausible).

Thanks in advance.
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