mysecetlife (mysecetlife) wrote in little_details,
mysecetlife
mysecetlife
little_details

The Ethics of Antagonist Attributes

Okay, so I created a whole new Livejournal just to post this here.

I'm writing a story. I don't want to go into too many details of the plot, but it involves a secret organization, death, and magic.

There's a lot of bullshit that happens at the beginning and middle of the story, but what I'm worried about is the end.

Basically, protagonist kills someone using magic. He was actually trying to kill someone, just not the person he killed. The person he killed got in the way and dies. Unfortunately for the protagonist, the person he killed was a member of an organization, and now that he's killed him, this organization, and particularly their leader, wants to avenge his death. That's the main conflict in the latter part of the story. The protagonist is trying to avoid being killed by these people.

I was talking to a friend about it, and she had some problems with the characterization of the main antagonist, the leader of the organization. Why? Well, he's gay, and he can't walk. The way she put it was, "All having a gay antagonist is going to do is subtly reinforce public perception that gay people are wrong and evil." Also, he needs to be able to walk, because otherwise it's ableist or something.

I don't really understand this. I mean, I want the guy to be a kind of sympathetic villain. He's just trying to avenge his friend. He's got impeccable manners and treats everyone, even the protagonist, with respect, even when he's trying to kill them.

I suppose I should be citing my reasons for making him this way. I want him to be gay because I write gay male characters better than I do any other type of character, and I want him to be super-good.And why can't he walk? That's more complicated. I was thinking about the story and this conversation between the two of them (Oliver, the protagonist, and Chester, the antagonist) just popped into my head, and Chester was saying something about how he has real problems that he didn't cause by messing with magic himself, unlike Oliver, and I was thinking, what could those real problems be?

Is this a bad idea? I mean, if everyone thinks it is, I'll probably change it to make it better, but if there's no problem, I'm hitting the go button. It's got me worried. And now I'm thinking, if there's a problem with Chester, maybe there's a problem with the rest of them, too. Like maybe I shouldn't make the guy who gets killed Palestinian after all. And maybe Oliver shouldn't be bisexual.
Tags: ~homosexuality (misc)
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