chelonianmobile (chelonianmobile) wrote in little_details,
chelonianmobile
chelonianmobile
little_details

UK young offenders' institutions for females.

Setting: Early 2000s, England. Two girls, age 15/16-ish, are imprisoned for being involved in various antisocial activities - not together, they meet in the institution. Both of their sentences need to be fairly short, but it's rare for girls in the UK to be imprisoned in the first place, so they're not likely to get anything longterm unless they've killed someone. Neither of them has ever done anything resulting in a person being killed or seriously hurt, but one of them's been involved in some kind of property damage and requires psychiatric treatment for various reasons.

1. How long are prison sentences for young female offenders likely to be for varying degrees of crime? I can fudge this if necessary because it's not exactly a Real World setting and doesn't have to be entirely accurate, but I'd like to get at least a rough idea.

2. What is it actually like to be in an institution for female YOs?

I've found plenty of info on where they are and how they're structured by Googling variations on "young female offenders institute uk": for example, I found pages which say that they're usually just separate wings of an adult womens' prison, that there are usually only about four to six girls in one at once, and that they're kept in separate cells and don't have communal showers, but I've been unable to find anything which, say, explains what they do all day. Uniforms? Schooling? Contact with family? Interaction with each other?

EDIT: Comments have suggested that a secure childrens' home would work a lot better, since these two haven't done anything terribly severe. I agree, this would work better. So, anyone know much about what those are like?
Tags: uk: government: law enforcement
Subscribe

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic
    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 15 comments