Liz Starling (epstarling) wrote in little_details,
Liz Starling
epstarling
little_details

Parole conditions--modern day Colorado

Hello!

I have parole related questions that I'm having problems finding answers to. My novel takes place in Colorado, and my main character has recently been released from prison for second degree assault (she pleaded guilty).
  • I have it written at this time that she initially goes to community corrections (halfway house) for about six months after she's out of prison. Is that realistic? I'm also confused about whether that counts as part of her prison sentence or as parole time?
  • What would be the typical conditions of her parole (especially given she's a violent ex-con)? She was drunk when the crime took place, so I'm assuming AA meetings would likely be required. I assume she'd also have to avoid other felons, not be able to carry a gun, etc, but what else would be typical? And what would these likely cost her out of pocket?
  • I also assume she'd have to pay restitution to her victim. How does this work--does she pay him directly or would the money be garnished from her paycheck? What is a typical amount of restitution for assault (he suffered minor head wounds and some facial lacerations, spent a couple of days in the hospital)?
  • What about curfew? I plan to have her take a job at a hospital that would typically require her to start on the night shift. Would she be able to take the job, or would she be forced to only take day jobs?
  • What happens if a parole officer comes to her apartment and she's not there--or at work? Would she just receive a notice and have to report by a certain time, or is she more limited in her activities? (She is a runner and often runs for an hour or two at a time.)
  • What would she need to do to travel to or take a job in another town within the state? Is notifying her PO enough, or does she have to petition for it?
I also have an unhappy coworker that wants to get her fired and/or rearrested. She calls my main character's PO and reports a possible violation--claiming that she's been acting "bizarre" (implying that she's on drugs) and that she verbally attacked a patient. Could the PO go to her apartment after receiving this report and search her apartment? Could he require her to take a UA? How likely would he take a complaint like this--especially if her UA is negative but he has suspicions that there is something illegal going on but has no concrete evidence (he reads part of her journal)? Ultimately, how much discretion does the PO have in how to handle the reported violation?

I know this is a lot of information, but any help at all is greatly appreciated!

Have done many, many searches: I have read books on criminal law (including police procedurals), internet search terms include "parole conditions," "parole terms," "reporting parole violation," "parole officer," "contact parole officer," etc, and included modifiers such as "Colorado" to get specific information on Colorado law. I have also looked through Colorado statutes and other law-related websites.
 


Tags: usa: colorado, usa: government: law enforcement (misc)
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