Skazka (supercrook) wrote in little_details,
Skazka
supercrook
little_details

eye gouging and Victorian treatment methods?

terms googled already: Eye gouging, missing eye, eye injury. I mostly got eye gouging as a punishment for crime and eye gouging in football.

(Apologies if this question has been asked in some permutation already-- this is my first post to this community, and I love it to bits already, so I at least tried to check if there was anything glaringly obvious written about it here. I've got plenty of information, a good deal thanks to this comm, about facial scarring and such-- it's the actual damage to the socket that I'm worried about.)

I've got a character living in Paris (in about the mid-19th century) who's gotten into a brawl with someone-- the other man is fairly drunk, and borderline-psychopathic to begin with. It ends with him going for my boy's eyes. In the end, the victim has to lose one eye entirely, or have it badly damaged enough to warrant removal.

My first question is-- eugh-- considering the sanitation of the time, what kind of injury would be bad enough to cause him to lose the eye? Would it take actual, er, puncturing of the eyeball via gouging, or would a glancing strike (most likely with the thumbs) be bad enough? Secondly, what kind of "treatment" would there likely be, and who would he go to? Would there be anyone he could go to? (He's a slum dweller and a petty criminal. He's also a former prostitute.) What's the socket likely to end up looking like?
(Also, the victim himself is fairly mentally unbalanced. In addition to the large amounts of pain he'd be in, would shock be involved? It's pretty reflexive to try and get away from someone attacking you so, but would he actually be able to, without passing out first or falling down the stairs?)
Tags: ~medicine: historical, ~medicine: injuries to order
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