Jessica (nessanar) wrote in little_details,
Jessica
nessanar
little_details

Transportation and hospital care in mass casualty incidents, also medical slang

When: I'm thinking early- to mid-nineties, but it could easily be moved up or down a decade or so if needed.
Where: Don't quite know; southeastern United States, in a very rural area.
Searched: I read the wiki page on "triage", as well as googling several combinations of "triage", "medical slang", "southern U.S.", etc.

I found one huge compilation that was pretty informative, but mostly useless because it doesn't separate between regions (or sometimes countries). If you're interested, look here: http://www.messybeast.com/dragonqueen/medical-acronyms.htm The rest has been a bust.

Basically, the set-up is an incident that leaves involves a good number of people (I'm thinking 20-40). Right now, it's going to be a pretty serious automobile pileup, that leaves one or two dead on the scene, a handful in Priority 1 situations, where they need immediate assistance, and the majority with non-life-threatening injuries.

There's a hospital about fifteen minutes away, but it's pretty small (think 10 double-bed rooms, 2-patient capacity ICU, etc. - I don't know if that sounds feasible, but this building should be pretty small) and unprepared for major trauma and surgery. The next nearest hospital/trauma center should be at least an hour (preferably more) away. My questions:

1.) In the absence of helicopter transportation, EMS personnel would just have to try and sort out the Priority 1 patients and rush them to the small hospital, right? At least to be stabilized until better services were available?

2.) In what ways would treatment and technology in such a small hospital differ from bigger ones? What could probably not be easily treated? More specifically, what kind of injuries would move patients from Priority 1/Red levels into the Black "probably going to die, go ahead and give up so we can work on other patients" level? Where is the line drawn?

3.) What kind of slang could an EMS member use to communicate to the head nurse that he thought a patient had gone beyond saving during the ambulance ride? The phrase "going black" keeps popping into my head, but that sounds like he's already dead, and I think it would be pretty insensitive to say around the other patients. The list I linked to gave a good example- "Code Azure"- but can you think of any others? Does it just depend on the hospital?

4.) When a patient is considered too far gone, where would they be moved to? An empty room? Would such a small facility have the time or supplies to give such a patient painkillers? Or would they just be left on their own somewhere?

I would appreciate any help!
Tags: usa: health care and hospitals, ~medicine: emts/paramedics
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