December 8th, 2009

Legality of Parental Child Abduction

My story is set in New York City, in the very near future, but the abduction took place in California (specifically the Inland Empire) in the mid-nineties, between 1995 and 1997 (haven't settled on a year yet).

My character Olivia was a victim of parental kidnapping when she was eleven. She hasn't had any contact with her father since. Now, I can find lots of information on international child abductions and on parental abductions post-divorce, but Olivia's parents were still married at the time (ie, her mother had custody) and she was taken across state lines, but remained within the US. I know that California has a law against parental child abductions, but I can't find out when it was enacted or whether it covers cases where the parents were still married.

So. My gut feeling is that what Olivia's mother did is very, very illegal. However, I don't know how illegal it is, or when it became illegal (when her mother kept her away from her father past a certain number of days?). Any information would be helpful.

Searches tried: "parental child abduction," "interstate child abduction," "child abduction facts," "child abduction California," and various combinations of the phrases "parental", "interstate" and "abduction."

Need some WWII info

It truly is a little detail, but one of those things that can be fairly important.

Anyway, I have Googled my brains out, as well as dragging a few books down off the shelves, and been directed to a book at Amazon that might actually be helpful, only it won't be available until January... And basically have gotten nowhere.

So, my question is: Would blackout restrictions have still been in effect in New York City, December 1944? What I have found is that these restrictions continued in London until 1945, but I'm wondering if they might have been lifted earlier for the East Coast of the United States. My story works either way, if they were still in blackout mode or not; it's just a matter of hitting the right atmosphere.

Thanks!