April 10th, 2009

Picking People Up from Hospitals

Say someone is terribly injured in the street (some sort of accident). He is brought unconscious into the hospital and remains in serious condition for a few days. He has a wallet and identification on him, but he lives alone and there is no one to call, and no family members live in the country. Basically, no one knows he's ill. When he wakes up, he has amnesia. Someone does come by to claim him, but he isn't family. He tells the nurses that he is a friend. When it's time for the patient to go home, is this friend allowed to take him home? Is there some way that hospital administration checks that this "friend" isn't a stalker? Do they just let anyone walk in and walk off with you?

As you can tell, I don't know much about hospitals, but this struck me as suspect when I was plotting in my head. Of course, if the real world isn't convenient for my cliched little soap opera, I'll just ignore it, but it's always nice to at least take a stab at realism. :D

Last names meaning 'false'

I've looked on various sites and used google and Ask. Every last name meaning site has prompted me to put a name in to find the meaning which isn't helpful.

Basically I'm looking for a last name that means false, pretend, fake, any associated words. I could modify a first name or use a word but I'd prefer to have an actual last name.

Searched 'last name meaning (various words), last name meanings, names that mean (various words).
Tags:

Yakuza: Name(s) of Inagawa-kai sub-clan(s)

The Inagawa-kaï is the third largest yakuza family in Japan, with roughly 7,400 members divided into 313 clans.

I have been completely unable to find the name of even one of these clans - or even what kind of name they could be expected to have (something prosaic like "Nakamura clan"? Or dramatic like "Clan of the Red Dragon"? Or pseudo-traditonal like "Heroic Samurai of Ginza"?).

All my googling has led to nothing - everyone seems to be copying everyone else here, and persistently speaks of sub-clans, but never names any of them.

If anyone knows names of sub-clans of the other yakuza families, that would also be helpful - I could extrapolate...

Thank you!

The Rhineland from a German perspective

Setting: Berlin, late 1944

I have a group of pro-Nazi Germans who, in discussion, mention the Rhineland. Now, I can easily find historical facts about the Rhineland (and plenty of tourism!) and details about Nazi Germany entering in 1936 in spite of the Versailles treaty, but, naturally, the history is not from the perspective of anyone who thought this was a good and glorious action. So I'm trying to find that perspective.

Possibilities:
- Insulting the French, who should have stopped them?
- Insulting the British, who didn't do anything because it happened over a weekend?
- Mocking the Allies for being weak?

My general history in this period isn't great, so any ideas of how to make this sound realistic - especially in the context of the end of the war - would be appreciated. Thanks!

Civil rights lawyers and money

I'm writing a short story in a universe similar to our own in some ways, and wildly different in others. My main character is a civil-rights attorney. I was doing fine in this story until I got to the issue of money. I tried Google, and didn't get anything truly relevant. (Nothing that had any information in it, anyway.) Because this universe is fantasy, I could just use handwavium, but I want it to be realistic where law practice is concerned. So how does a civil rights attorney make money?

It may also be important to note that the one actually asking for help already has full civil rights of her own, and is asking on behalf of someone whose people do not currently (in that universe) have any legal rights.

EDIT: Thanks everyone! You've all been very helpful.
Tags:

Lost at sea: psychological/practical repercussions

I've been researching long-term potential mental and practical repercussions of being lost at sea for an extended period of time.
 
The physical affects are easy enough to find as far as the lost at sea period is concerned, and there is some broad info about recovery time after rescue.

What I cannot find is potential long term changes in behavior or thinking patterns, beyond the generic label of PTSD.

I'm imagining that people might hoard food, or guard their access to water, for example, or possibly be agoraphobic. I would love some actual examples. I've read some survivors' accounts in the past but they seemed to cover the lost at sea period far more than the aftermath.

I've searched for many variatiosn on "lost at sea," "shipwreck," "sea disaster," "afteraffects," "psychological impact," but I haven't found what I am looking for.

I feel like if I could just hit on the correct terminology, the answer would be out there.

Any ideas where I can find this info or thoughts on how I could search?