May 11th, 2007

Death from Exhaustion

Time period: Modern America (same universe as my mental health question. Yes, it's a long story). I have no idea how to research this. Everything I've tried has just brought up information about chronic fatigue syndrome and/or the danger to patients of interns working too many 24-hour shifts a month. Once again, I turn my tired eyes to you.

This is what I need to know:

I'm almost sure you can die of exhaustion, I just don't know how it works. I don't mean sleep deprivation, though I know that can definitely be fatal. What I mean is, something like the legend of the Runner of Marathon, who delivered news of a victorious battle and then dropped dead.

So, is it possible to push one's (normally healthy) body to the point where it just gives up and crashes? What would 'crash', so to speak? (Heart? Lungs? Deadly buildup of lactic acid? None of the above?) And can you be brought back from the brink at the point of collapse? If so, how? Glucose? Adrenaline? Enforced bed rest?

As usual, any help with this would be appreciated beyond measure. I literally can't continue until I know the answer to this. It'll affect the outcome of the whole story.

Thank you!

ETA: Thank you to those who responded. Obviously my post wasn't clear enough, however. I was more interested in how someone might be saved from dying from exhaustion, and what the symptoms might be, rather than if it was just possible (since I was almost certain it was). Since it seems that heart failure is the first and bigger threat, I'll go with that. Thank you again.

Help me translate this insult into British!

I need a colorful expression that essentially translates to "psycho bitch". The character speaking has been repeatedly been tortured by the aforementioned psycho bitch and believes that she's returned for another round, so it needs to be good and angry. I'm finding a lot of expressions that have an affectionate edge to them, and he's not feeling affectionate at all. As insulting as possible is the goal.

The character speaking has a North West English accent, but almost certainly hasn't resided in England in at least fifteen years, if that helps at all.

I've googled and wiki'd for various slang, but most sites seem geared towards translating from British to American, not the other way around.

Thanks!

English Country Churches

I've done several searches using country, rural, church, England, history, 19th century for some of my keywords. I've specified English counties (Cumbria and Somerset, specifically) and even zeroed in on a random church (St. Bartholomew's Church in Foston, Leicestershire) just to get an idea. All the information I got pretty much focused on the church's location, architecture, and history, but nothing more specific for what I need.

My question is this: in the mid-19th century (location: Somerset, or Exmoor to be exact), were country churches open, outside their usual services, to the public? Did it depend on the denomination (Catholic, Anglican, Baptist, Methodist)?

I'm writing about a casual visitor who decides to go inside a church to study it or simply spend some time meditating. It's a spur-of-the-moment decision for him, and he wanders into a random church tucked away in a pretty lonely area without the help or permission of a churchwarden (or whoever has the key).

plumbing problem: broken pipes

The story is set in modern day New Jersey, not that I believe it really matters. My characters have just had a pipe break in their apartment, causing a flood. The problem is, though I like the idea, I know nothing about broken pipes and Googling phrases like "broke pipes," "busted pipes," etc. is mostly providing me with links to an article about how a sewage pipe broke in New York, and weblogs where people say, "My pipe has busted" and nothing else except that they owe the plumber a lot of money.

What I need is some sort of first-hand info about 1. how you can tell that your pipes have broken, 2. how fast it would make a huge mess, and 3. could it be the pipes in your shower rather than your basement? Most of the people who complain seem to have their basements flooded out, but this is an apartment.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

International LiveJournal usage

This is a somewhat random question I know, and it's not the sort of thing that usually comes up here, but I don't know where else to ask. There seem to be a lot of knowledgable people here, so hopefully one of you will be able to help me out or point me in another direction.

Is there anywhere I can look that will give me a list of countries that have some part of their population (1 person would be enough) using Livejournal? I don't really need statistics although they might come in handy. Is there some kind of Livejournal information community I could try asking? Is this information even available anywhere or shall I just post a poll and be done with it?
I've tried various google searches and nothing remotely promising has turned up and I've also looked through various LJ related communities. I can't see anything in the LJ FAQS etc either.

Question answered. Thanks.

Intrahospital racism?: Hapa/Vietnamese

My story is set in 1996 in a southern CA county hospital, with the main character (an intern doctor) being hapa (mixed Chinese-American and white), a lot of the nurses being native-born Vietnamese.

My question: Would the nurses give her a hard time because she's mixed, or Chinese? What might she think about them? I have no idea what the interaction would be. This character is third generation American.

Looked up: (google) racial tension chinese vietnamese, racism chinese vietnamese, racial epithets, medical racism chinese vietnamese, chinese vietnamese "medical staff", vietnamese nurses
(wikipedia) racial slurs, vietnamese, chinese american, hapa, american-born chinese

I found the terms "bamboo pole", "banana", "twinkie", but I don't know if these words would come from Vietnamese women or if these are more Chinese on Chinese racist terms. Or if they would defer to her because she's a doctor and not give her trouble at all.

Please don't speculate in your answer. If you don't know, say so. Thanks in advance!
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