December 6th, 2006

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Inter-Cultural Marriage (South Indian/African American), modern US

Say it's 1990 and two med school students meet and fall in love. One of them is an African-American woman with a mother and step-father who started a kind of urban-hippy restaurant in the 70s. The other is South Indian (probably Kerala). Her parents don't really care, but I know his are relatively likely to be pissed. Now, my question is...since he is insisting on this wedding, will his parents insist on an elaborate one, or will traditional Indian elements be out of the question since he's marrying a non-Indian? Or is it more likely that they don't come at all and the two (and her family and their friends) have a civil ceremony?

As far as religions go, her family's got that kind of 1970s quasi-Buddhist Unitarian thing going on and she's kind of a hard-line scientist, so she rolls her eyes at it but doesn't mind. His family is Hindu but like a lot of young men in the US, he's not really religious about it. He did grow up in the US, but his parents didn't.
Gabriel
  • dien

Getting U.S. ID/proof of existence?

Hey gang! *waves*

I've got a non-human character (originally an angel) who in the course of his canon gets turned into a human, and at later point in his canon displays a (genuine) driver's license and so forth. I want to write some fanfic dealing with him getting adjusted to human life, but the Little Details ;) are tripping me up. To get the license, he'd have had to display a birth certificate, which he obviously wouldn't have. Looking into what one does if there is no birth certificate on file has turned up the concept of the Letter of No Record, but even that requires the subject to prove ID with other forms of paperwork-- doctor's forms, baptismal certificates, etc etc. This character wouldn't have any paperwork to prove his life, as he's basically entering human existence as a fully grown male.

So. If there was no supporting documentation he could produce, how could he possibly go about obtaining ID and so forth in the United States? I don't know if it matters, but this would be under California law, as the story takes place in Los Angeles.

Much oblige for any help anyone can shed on the matter.
Red Sag
  • arabwel

Fancy guitars?

(crossposted to little_details and my LJ)

So, I am looking for a fancy guitar. Except, it is not supposed to appear fancy.

the scenario is this: an aged rock star gives his beloved guitar to his protege when they part ways. I wnat this guitar to be v. v. specvial, except, not relaly look the part - not something you would recognize as omgspeshul lamorghini of guitars at a first glance. And I know jack about guitars - so I am asking you guys, what kind of a guitar could/should this be?
best hug ever

Foster Care/Adoption Legality

Hello, wonderful community. I'm writing a play that revolves around two sixteen-year-old boys. One's father died two years before the play begins, and he's living with his grandmother. A week before the play begins, his mother (whom her son has thought dead since he was a baby--the rest of the family knew she just ran out on her boyfriend and their son) returns demanding custody. But the son wants to stay with his grandmother.

Question #1: What, if any, rights does the grandmother have? Can she legally adopt him? (if the mother agreed, for example.) And if the mother still wanted custody, could the grandmother take legal action against her?

The other boy's parents have been dead since he was a baby. He's lived in several foster homes. For the past ten years, he's lived in New York state with various families. The family he's living with currently has to move to Oregon, but he doesn't want to leave Boy Character 1. He's decided to confront Boy Character 1 and tell him he's in love with him. If Boy Character 1 returns the feeling, Boy Character 2 will stay.

Question #2: Could he switch to another family in New York? Or would he have to stay with, I don't know, social services? Ultimately, I want him to stay in New York. How do I do this legally?

I thank anyone who offers information in advance.