December 23rd, 2004

First Post

I'm currently writing a scene where my main character (first POV) drives a car off a cliff at about 100 MPH (I don't know what that is in KPH--actually, how do you do the ratio for that?). The height of the cliff and the type of car is purely debatable (the car has to be fast enough to go 100 mph though), but cliff itself is steep and on the edge of an ocean, so when it falls, it goes straight down in the air. How high would the cliff have to be, and what kind of car would I need, in order for the character to remain alive, but injured? What would be the most painful way for the car to land, without it blowing up and him still remaining alive? This is all assuming he's wearing seatbelt, as well. I want him to hurt and he doesn't have to come out conscious, so we can play a little if need be. The cliff is also open--I doesn't have to be a 90 degree angle cliff... it can roll if that brings a better effect. I basically just want a shell shocker--the worst you can possibly make it without him actually dying on me. Help?

Spinal injuries-

The question about falls inspired me to ask about one of my own.

A seven year old girl climbs on the roof of a house (a one story, I'm thinking, but I can take it up to two) from a tree. At some point, she slips and falls off, hitting the ground and/or the tree (I have yet to decide if she hits the tree on the way down). This fall ultimately results in permanent paralysis from about the hips down.

Firstly, what bones would she have to break and/or what spinal damage would cause such paralysis? Secondly, other than basic bruises and maybe a(nother) broken limb, what other damages might she incur? I'm not going for major head injuries here other than a concussion. The major thing about this fall is that she ends up never being able to walk again afterwards. I've forgotten most of my medical classes from high school, so I can't remember precisions here.

Thanks in advance.

oh the things I do in the name of fanfiction

Long time reader, first time poster, wow, feel like I'm on talk radio! *laughs*

Anyway, while I know I can probably fudge a bit (hooray for non-existant countries!), I'd like to keep some semblance in reality. So! Christmas in 1935 in a Germanic high aristocracy household. What all would go on the Christmas tree - lights, I know (probably bubble lights, even, because these boys have waaaay too much money, but then again it's a 15-foot tree, so....), glass ornaments . . . things to sparkle? But what kinds of shapes? Flowers and birds? Angels and stars? Little drummer boys? All of the above? Would there be a nativity set up somewhere? Other things I'm forgetting? Like the name of the candle-powered wooden "toy" - the heat from the candle spins the blades of a pinwheel at the top that sets other things in motion.

How about music? Radio, phonograph, carols, Handel's Messiah? Mistletoe? Hmm, that could be trouble.... ~_^ Thanks in advance. ^__^
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Small question.

Hey folks, long time lurker, first time poster. Does anyone know the correct spelling for "Rest in Peace" in Latin? My brother speaks Latin, but the dork's not home. Help would be appreciated. I tried the online dictionaries, but they were little help, as I don't know the sentence structure and all. Thanks muches.
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(no subject)

For starters, let me just say that I think this community is amazing. I've learned so many things that I sorely needed to know (and a bunch of stuff that I didn't, but was happy to learn anyway), and I only wonder why no one thought of this before. More importantly... why didn't I think of this? >.<

Anyway, my first question is this:

Could someone who has just gone into cardiac arrest still be unconscious if they have been successfully revived, or would the shock of suddenly being able to breathe again wake them up?

My second question:

What are some of the ways that a person could be treated for mercury poisoning? I've heard of this procedure where you have to have an IV drip for about three to four hours every day, but are there any other ways to extract mercury from someone's system? And if someone has taken in enough mercury that their minds have been affected, is there any way to reverse that effect, or is it permanent brain damage? (Okay, so that was three questions... ^_^; )

Thanks in advance!
  • Current Mood: curious
  • Current Music: E.S. Posthumus - Antissa

Hearing Loss

First post here, so I have to give the obligatory shout-out to the creator: THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS!

Okay, I have a character in a fairly typical low-tech fantasy world. At some point in his late teens, something happens that makes him lose his hearing entirely, but I have no clue how that could happen. Just about the only ways I know of to deafen someone permanently are being too close to a big explosion (might be slightly difficult with the lack of technology), brain injury (not sure how likely he'd be to survive that, even with healing spells), and illness (and I'm not even sure that would work on a young adult). If it matters, he was born already somewhat hard-of-hearing due to his mother being sick while pregnant.

I'm not very picky about how much hearing this leaves him with; I just need it to be severe enough so he has no hope of holding a conversation. Any help is appreciated, I've been stumped over this for ages!