vasher (vasher) wrote in little_details,
vasher
vasher
little_details

Extra-strength strangulation

Ok, I've looked through the memories here, which were very helpful, especially this post, and googled- "strangulation", "strangulation forensics", "strangulation autopsy", "strangulation injuries", "child strangulation", "chicken wringing". Ahem.

So setting is fantasy- there's magic and dragons and swords, but also modern technology such as guns/genetic engineering.

I have a normal character that's killed via strangulation by an enhanced soldier. There's a lot of leeway on how strong the attacker is, exactly, but he's canonically able to swing his giant 6+ ft. sword around without any trouble. The non-special characters don't use such ridiculously oversized weapons, so I'm assuming that they have your average Real Life abilities.

Victim (V) was initially leaning over attacker (A), (A) lunges up and throttles V without much trouble. A has slight build, short stature. V is heavier build, average height. Both males.

There's a cursory autopsy done later- somewhere between 2-6 hrs. What I'd like to know is how the people examining the body could tell that A was, in fact, one of these superhuman guys. I'm envisioning something like A crushing V's neck- something that a regular person wouldn't be able to do. So smushed trachea, hyoid bone, vertebrae (or just fractured transverse processes?), much more bruising, possibly less signs of struggling... What would be some good external signs?

Also, regarding bruising on the neck- how accurate are the handprints to A's hands? I've heard that victims sometimes have imprints detailed enough to show the texture of the rope used, but I'm not sure if this would be a similar case. Mostly, I want to know if the general size of A could be inferred from them.

Thanks!
Tags: ~forensics: corpses, ~medicine: injuries (misc)
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