lisabel (lisabel) wrote in little_details,
lisabel
lisabel
little_details

Crippling Injuries to the Leg

I must admit that I have a very small understanding of anatomy and medical practice, and that reading highly technical documents confuses me easily - so I'm turning once again to the lovely people of this community for help. Having done some research into forms of torture in use during the 18th and early 19th century, I have not been able to hit on anything that really fits what I need for my story...

I have a character whose leg I want to be crippled - but how it got that way, I am unsure, and to what extent the leg is crippled is up in the air. Given the medical knowledge between the years of say, 1790-1811, I figure that most serious injuries would usually end up with the leg being amputated to avoid gangrene, etc. However, I want this character to keep his leg, even if he requires the permanent and constant use of a stick to get around. Given that the injury was sustained while he was an active intelligence agent, methods of torture would seem the most likely, but other than squassation which would dislocate the joints of the hips and legs and kneecapping, which I'm pretty sure would have resulted in an amputation then, I haven't been able to locate any methods in use that would cause a permanent injury to a lower limb. I suppose I could try to make something up myself, but my lack of knowledge as to human anatomy hinders me. If possible, I'd still like him to be able to ride a horse, even if it means he'll have to have help getting on and off the animal, and persistent, low-grade pain in the affected limb would be a plus. I know that this is all rather vague and I apologize for that; but any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Tags: ~medicine: injuries to order, ~medicine: injuries: broken bones
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