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Names meaning "trickster" or "trickery".
cubanseapower wrote in little_details

Hello. I'm trying to find a girl's name that means "trickster" or "trickery", or anything close to that for a character in my story.

I tried looking and the only name I came up with so far was Leah. It's a good name, but I just don't think it fits her personality.

Can you help me by giving me a list of girl's names meaning anything close to "trickery", or maybe even a webpage of names like that? Thank you so much. :D

Tags:

Loki, naturally. Also Wiley or Wylie or variation thereof. All three can be for a boy or girl.

http://www.behindthename.com/name/s18a10rka -- a legendary character who was a trickster

There's always Eris, goddess of discord.

You could modify a name like Loki or Raven or Coyote to suit your character.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trickster There is a list of the Trickster figures in different cultures there.


Story? (Anonymous) Expand
Just wondering, where did you find the Leah = trickery thing? I just named a character that and when I looked it up a couple weeks ago and nearly every source I saw listed it as meaning "weary/delicate/sad-eyed" or some close variant.

Wiki has a list of trickster gods/mythical figures from many cultures - you could add feminine endings or come up with a name they'd be plausible nicknames for.

Oh, I get it, Biblical allusion for Leah sleeping with Jacob through trickery - never mind! :)

Medea means the cunning one, or cunning contriver. Would that work for you?

Although I think that would make my story kind of sound science fiction, I'm liking Medea more than Leah. Thank you! :)

In bandom, Patrick Stump's name is often shortened to 'Trick' - what about giving her the name Patricia, and having her go by 'Trick' in the same way?

Hmm... I actually really like that idea. Thank you! :)

How about Trixie? If you're looking for other tricky female people, there are (as well as Medea) Circe, Vivien/Nimue and Salome.

Circe kind of sounds Greek. Thank you! :)

Yeah. I've heard of that one from the show "Supernatural" and have been thinking about it. Thank you! :)

There's also Blodeuwedd (pronounced something like blow-die-weth). It means flowery faced. She was a woman created from flowers and had no soul. She fell in love with another man and plotted with him to kill her husband. Her husband, Lleu Llaw Gyffes, couldn't be killed by normal means. She had to trick him into telling her how he could be killed and then tricked him into showing her how he had to stand, etc. Her lover than murdered him. She fled, was pursued, turned into an owl. Owls are supposedly called after her today in Wales.

Question, unrelated to original question, but do you know of a good place to find info on Welsh legends, then? Thanks in advance

Well, there's also similar ones like Chance or Foxy (a fox can be a trickster...) There's also Coyote, which I think is a better male name, and Ananasi, which is the African spider trickster. There's also Raven or Crow, or something like Ruse (which sounds like Rose to me, which could cause some interesting misunderstandings)

Those are some pretty good options. Thank you! :)

I did a little googling into this a while ago (trying to work out if Scheherazade was going to work for me - she's almost a trickster :)

There aren't very many female tricksters, but, depending on how far you want to stretch the definition, there's a thread on this old post that might give you some ideas: http://blog.pjsattic.com/corvus/2006/09/female-tricksters/

I particularly liked the Japanese multi-tailed fox spirits 'kitsune'.

There's also the African-American Aunt Nancy, the spider, derived from the (male) Anansi. (The best-known tricksters are pretty gender-fluid in their stories - think Bugs Bunny in 'What's Opera, Doc?')

I'd be wary of using Medea - she went a bit mad and killed her children when dumped by Jason (of 'and the Argonauts' fame)

Also (ok, clearly I've been thinking about this too much :) - Puck is also known as Robin Goodfellow "that shrewd and knavish sprite / Call'd Robin Goodfellow", and Robin's pretty non-gendered these days. (Robin by itself means 'bright fame')

That's some pretty good advice. Thank you! :)

In old Hungarian fairytales, there is a female trickster known as "Katie-Free-As-The-Wind"

Hmm.. I'm actually considering Katie now. That'd be really cool if the origin was brought up in the story. Thank you! :)

Rebecca means "one who snares or traps"; Calypso is "she who conceals."

Rebecca was also one tricky woman in the Hebrew Bible. You could also go with Rivqah/Rivka or any of the other variants of the name.

Judith would also be a good trickster reference. See the apocryphal book of the Bible.

Corey is a derivation of Corvus, which is Latin for raven.

I'm actually growing pretty fond of the name "Corey" nowadays. Thank you! :)

Minx doesn't quite mean trickstery things, but it sounds good... A nickname of "Fox" or "foxy" might also imply tricksiness.

I like the nicknaming idea. Thank you! :)

You could call her Koko, as in Kokopelli, the trickster in southwestern Native American culture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kokopelli

The sound of "Koko" reminds me of Chanel. Hahah, little feminine touch. But I like the name very much. Thank you! :)

Lots of great suggestions here. Another one from Christian mythology: Delilah. Also, I've always loved how the name sounds, so that could be a plus.

I agree. Thank you! :D

Re: Deliliah (Anonymous) Expand
Eve (or Eva, Evelyn) if you go with Biblical allusions.

That could be a good one. Thank you! :)